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The Real Reason Why People MUST Squat Differently

by Ryan DeBell | Follow on Twitter

There is absolutely no one size fits all squat position. If you don’t believe me, you are in for a treat.

Is There a Perfect Squat Form? | thePTDC | How to Improve Your Squat Stance
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The following is a guest post from Ryan DeBell (Instagram). It originally appeared on his site, the Movement Fix, and is republished here with permission.


This article will help show you why athlete comfort should dictate squat stance width, why some people’s (not EVERYONE) feet point out (no matter how much “mobility” work they do), why some people have a really hard time squatting deep, and why some people are amazing at pistols while others can’t do them at all.

This article will answer the question: why do people have to squat differently?

Basic Anatomy

The hip joint is basically made up of a “socket” on the pelvis (called the acetabulum) and a “ball” at the top of your thigh bone (femur), which we call the femoral head. Around the hip joint are a lot of muscles, a joint capsule, and connective tissue. There are many other anatomical considerations when considering a squat, but let’s focus on the hip.

Anatomical Variations

When someone has difficulty squatting, or their feet turn out, or they like a wide stance, we all want to jump on the bandwagon and say “your hips are tight, you need to mobilize them.” If we say that without considering anatomical variations of the hip joint, we can be misled.

Let’s take a look at this first picture. Here we have two femurs from two different people. One points more upwards, the other points more downwards. Do you think these people will squat the same when they have that much bony difference?

How to improve your squats | thePTDC | Squat Posture

Two different femurs. One points left, the other up. You think that these two people should squat the same?

If you aren’t convinced yet, take picture 2. Clearly one of the “balls” in the ball and socket joint is extended longer off the femur than the other. This will absolutely change the mechanics of squatting between these two people. No amount of soft tissue treatment will change that.

how to improve squat form | thePTDC | hip mobility and squats

The “ball” of the ball and socket joint on the left is clearly longer than the one on the right.

Now look at picture number 3 below. Look at how different the angle is that the ball is pointing between these two femurs. Guess what? One of these people will have a bony block when they try to squat narrow while the other can squat narrow like a champ.

Alternatively, one will squat wide and the other will have pain with wide squatting. But doesn’t the difference in the shape of the “ball” make that seem obvious? Maybe your piriformis isn’t the limitation after all.

squat foot position | thePTDC | how to improve squat depth

One of these people will never be able to squat narrow while the other will be able to do it with no issues, can you guess which is which?

Things get even more interesting when you start looking at the socket. Take a look at picture number 4. On the left, you can see into the socket. This person will likely be able to squat with a narrow stance versus the person on the right who will literally run into themselves when squatting with a narrow stance.

hip mobility and squats | thePTDC | squat stance width

Same size pelvis, huge different in the space in the joint.

Now look at picture 5. Again, we see the difference in how much of the hip socket we can see. There is no way these two people will squat the same. The bony anatomy literally won’t let them.

hip structure and squat form | thePTDC | hip tightness and squats

It’s not a “tightness” or soft tissue issue. There’s literally bone in the way. Nothing you can do other than change your form.

Picture 6 is a view looking at the hip socket from the side. One is pointing straight out, while the other is pointing down and in the front. My guess is one of these people will be better at pistols and one will be worse.

hip shape and squat form | thePTDC | squat posture

One hip’s pointing straight out, the other to the side.

So How Do You Figure Out the Best Squat Stance?

I’ve put together a short report for you to show you how to quickly assess the hips on yourself or a client to know what the perfect squat is. It comes complete with 8 video walk-throughs of the assessments. Enter your email in the box below to get it right now:

Free Report: Get a Perfect Squat Every Time!

Enter your email below and click "Get My Report" to get a free .pdf copy of "How to Test the Hips for a Perfect Squat Every Time"

  • Video demonstrations of all 8 assessments discussed
  • Squat pain-free and with more power by learning the right stance for you and your clients

In addition to your report, you’ll also get FREE access to the PTDC newsletter, which you’ll receive 2-3 times a week. Your email will never be shared and you can unsubscribe anytime. Privacy and terms at the bottom of this page.

Conclusion

Athlete’s won’t squat the same, and they SHOULDN’T! I hope I shed some light on the WHY. Athlete comfort will dictate their squat stance that puts their hip in a better bony position. There are narrow squatters and there are wide squatters. That may have nothing to do with tight muscles or “tight” joint capsules but have more to do with bony hip anatomy.

Very few people are at the end range of their hip motion, so hip mobility drills are definitely a good idea.

People will express their hip mobility in different planes, and that is not a bad thing.

All photos were used with permission from Paul Grilley’s bone photo gallery. 


Enter your email in the box below to get the free complimentary report showing you video demonstrations of assessments to test your hip for the perfect squat for you.

Free Report: Get a Perfect Squat Every Time!

Enter your email below and click "Get My Report" to get a free .pdf copy of "How to Test the Hips for a Perfect Squat Every Time"

  • Video demonstrations of all 8 assessments discussed
  • Squat pain-free and with more power by learning the right stance for you and your clients

In addition to your report, you’ll also get FREE access to the PTDC newsletter, which you’ll receive 2-3 times a week. Your email will never be shared and you can unsubscribe anytime. Privacy and terms at the bottom of this page.

About the Author
Ryan DeBell

Ryan DeBell, M.S., D.C. graduated summa cum laude from the University of Western States with a doctorate in chiropractic and a master’s degree in exercise and sport science. He has a passion for human movement and helping people improve their health and performance. He owns and operates The Movement Fix and you can find him on Facebook.